In The News

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BrightContext Named Finalist of the 2013 Northern Virginia Technology Council Innovator Awards

BrightContext, a leader in massively scalable streaming data analytics, was named a finalist in the cloud category for the 2013 Innovator Awards, presented by the Northern Virginia Technology Council (NVTC). The Innovator awards honor technology pioneers within the region who have brought groundbreaking innovations to market that have delivered significant impact for their customers.
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Why The Big Data Systems of Tomorrow Will Mirror the Human Brain of Today

John Funge: When people think of big data, often it’s in terms of Hadoop clusters with gargantuan piles of data. Yet the human brain is still lightyears beyond these systems in its ability to constantly monitor multiple input streams simultaneously, synthesize them into meaningful and unified models of the world, and take immediate action based on this sophisticated analysis.

While the Internet in its current incarnation is extremely well suited to answering queries by performing lookups on raw facts, feats of total consciousness that we perform with a yawn on our way to work escape even the most advanced supercomputers.
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Stream Processing Poised for Boost From Internet of Things

Ian B. Murphy: Soon, sensors on everything from cell phones to refrigerators will be sending constant streams of data, and there will be opportunities to unlock value and insights by combining streams and analyzing them on the fly. That will enable immediate actions.

Leo Scott, the CTO of the cloud-based stream processing platform BrightContext, said that his company has developed a new stream processing programming language called FunnelCake to give analysts better flexibility to handle the new streams. FunnelCake is a part of BrightContext’s recent 2.0 platform launch.
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Build your own data-stream mining NSA in the cloud with “FunnelCake”

Sean Gallagher: BrightContext makes building complex stream processing systems as easy as filling out a Web form and writing a few lines of script. Now, nearly anyone can create their own miniature NSA data center in Amazon’s cloud. The language, called FunnelCake, looks a bit like SQL or JavaScript. But unlike SQL, it’s designed for never-ending queries against huge streams of data running in parallel.
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Q&A with Cory Haik, Washington Post Executive Producer of Digital News

Cory Haik: We work with vendors who create things that complement our current offerings and bring value to our readers. When we look at vendors, we consider how interesting their product is, how we would use it and how we would go about applying it on our site. Building a live experience around the presidential debates was a priority for us, and by working with BrightContext, we were able to create a turnkey news experience around real-time feedback in a matter of days.
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Not Your Grandmother’s Presidential Debate

From Forbes: The Washington Post deploys a real-time sentiment graph next to its debate feed and you click “Agree” or “Disagree” as you watch the debate. This nifty module, powered by BrightContext, is very much like a traditional dial used in focus groups, but at web scale.

From the screenshot, you can see that close to 225,000 readers were giving thumbs up or down as Biden and Ryan squared off. BrightContext CEO John Funge said the technologies that enable real-time processing of such massive amounts of data (over 100 million communication instances between web clients and servers for a 90-minute debate) either didn’t exist or were nascent in 2008, so the users are getting quite a unique experience.
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The Future of Social Television

From VentureBeat: For all the legitimate buzz about social TV, one mystery remains: why hasn’t it come about? Why are most social TV experiences basically Twitter feeds?
The answer has to do with a modern problem of “real-time big data”—which is to say, instantly consuming, routing, processing and broadcasting large volumes of data.
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Platforms, Disruption, and Television: My Interview With John Funge of BrightContext

From the Huffington Post: If there’s any industry ripe for disruption, it’s television. Cable TV companies have long had near-monopolies in local markets, often angering customers with fees and a general lack of choice. It’s no coincidence that more and more people are looking at ditching their TVs altogether for less expensive and more flexible options. Enter BrightContext, a startup with big plans to disrupt television. By embracing platform thinking, big data, social media, and cloud computing, the company is poised to shake things up.
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BrightContext Secures Investment From CIT

From The Washington Business Journal: BrightContext Corp., an Arlington-based software development company, secured an investment from Virginia’s Center for Innovative Technology. The amount was not disclosed. BrightContext provides a cloud-based platform developers can use to build applications that can receive, process and report results on large volumes of real-time data.
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BrightContext Raises $1.74 Million for Real-Time Data Processing

From Digital Media Wire: BrightContext, the Arlington-based startup behind a platform that ultimately could allow millions of Internet-connected viewers to interact with one another and with TV programmers during a show, said on Monday it has raised $1.74 million in a new round of funding, led by Southern Capitol Ventures. Other participants included the founders of comScore, Bobby Yazdani and several angel investors. David Jones, a partner at Southern Capitol, joined the company’s board.
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